Online Resources for Addiction Recovery~By Ian M.

Online Resources for Addiction Recovery~By Ian M.

Written By Ian M.

If you, or a loved one, are struggling with addiction recovery, it can sometimes feel like you are on your own. Addiction is already extremely challenging, but it gets much worse when addicts are isolated. In order to heal, you need to have a network of people who care about you and are invested in your recovery and lasting success. You need people to help you find treatment and stick with the regimen when things become difficult.

On top of all of this, the reality of relapse is also common. In order to deal with relapse in a healthy and productive way, it is best to be involved with others who understand the challenges of recovery and how to navigate relapses. In the end, people with a strong support system are far more likely to be successful in their recovery journey than people without that kind of support.


Thankfully, you are not alone. There are people who currently share your struggles and others who have successfully recovered from their addictions. These people can share wisdom and experience with you. There are also caring professionals who have made it their profession to help people recover from addiction. They have studied for years to prepare them for situations just like yours. These people are ready and willing to be the support that you need. All you need to do is find them.


Fortunately–with the internet–you can find help fairly quickly. There are numerous websites, often from nonprofit groups, that are dedicated to dispersing helpful information about addiction and recovery. Try to do some research and find programs, treatment centers, or physicians that you believe could help you. Not all treatment centers are the same, so you’ll want to spend time looking into their approach and determining which one is best for you.

Recovery-Month-2017.001-header

On many websites, you may find helpful information about addiction and the challenges that you will need to face. Other websites provide detailed information about where you can find support groups near you. You might even have several resources available to you in your home town that you never knew about. This article has a few of the most well-known addiction recovery sites where you can search various facilities. However, it’s important to note that many of these listings are paid, so it’s up to you to really research and see which one is best for you. Don’t rely on just trusting the one with the most resources to advertise.


The point is this, you can recover. You can get your life back together, and you can heal. It won’t be easy, and it will require time, patience, and a good measure of help from others. Remember, nothing worthwhile is easy, and sculpting out a new life for yourself is beyond worthwhile, it is critical. The first step is recognizing you have a problem. If you’re here, you’ve already done that. Take a look at some of the resources available to you online and start your path to recovery.

Alcoholics Anonymous

AA is a large organization with a proven track record of helping people with their addictions. They utilize they’re now famous, 12 step system to recover. AA will help you achieve your goals to be sober, but will also help you tend to your relationships and yourself. On the homepage of their website, they have a tool to help you find AA groups nearby where you live. Getting into a group full of people who share your struggle is crucial for success on your road to recovery. Take note that there are many variations of AA for people facing addictions besides alcoholism, as well.

shutterstock_439213456


Sex Addicts Anonymous

This is another organization, similar to Alcoholics Anonymous, that specializes in bringing people with similar struggles together for mutual support and strength. Their website also helps you find meetings nearby so that you can get the help you need. There are even options for joining meetings online. As the name implies, these meetings are confidential and you can be open with your peers.

Recovery.org

This website is another tool that you can use to get assistance with your addiction. The website includes valuable resources on topics such as withdrawals, where to find meetings, information on rehabilitation centers, and more. You will need as much information as possible in your fight against addiction. Knowledge and understanding lead to empowerment and planning, which can both lead to recovery. There is even information intended for the families of addicts. These resources are meant to inform and instruct family members of addicts and give them the tools necessary to bring their loved one to recovery.


Doesn’t matter what path you chose to start your recovery journey, sometimes many need more than one. But as long as you chose recovery, YOU can reclaim your life back from addiction… Ian 

My Friend & Fellow Author, Scott Stevens Has Some News & Advice. Well He Is The Alcohol Expert You Know.

My Friend & Fellow Author, Scott Stevens Has Some News & Advice. Well He Is The Alcohol Expert You Know.

Hello and Welcome Recovery Friends,

 

.
alcohology app 2
.
Have you ever wondered what alcohol does to you when it comes to your health?
How about when we see on the news about drinking a glass a wine each day and all the “so-called” health benefits we “supposedly” get from it? Or do you think you consume too much alcohol? How would you really know?

Well, my good friend and fellow Author, Scott Stevens has all the answers to these questions and much more! He has developed an Alcohol App that is free to use, and can help you tell if your drinking in excess.

He has also done research about those “so-called health benefits” we get from consuming alcohol. They are his personal feeling and thoughts of course. But Scott is The Alcohol Expert with three fantastic award-winning books under his belt!

So here are a couple of article shares of Scott’s that he shared recently on his own website here  Scott Stevens ~ Alcohology App & Website and also a new article on the APP over on Addicted Minds & Assoc. Fresh Perspectives Blog where we both are recovery/addiction contributing writers . . .

.
FREE ALCOHOLOGY APP  2.0 Released For Those Questioning Alcohol Use.

.

Keynote speaker, award-winning author Scott Stevens
.

The updated Alcohology app version 2.0 is free and ad-free, effective Jan. 21, 2016. The Android app includes 70 video vignettes supporting the fact that sobriety is a better thing to have than to lack. Alcohology looks at alcohol’s role in health issues from Fetal Alcohol Syndrome to cancer to dementia to alcoholism, plus has sobriety-saving hints in its mini-features. The app is geared toward those new to sobriety and those in pre-contemplation: Thinking about the choice not to drink, but need evidence that what causes problems is one.

The app update – available only for Android devices and not designed for Apple IOS at this time – is timed to coincide with the first anniversary of the platform as well as “The Dry January Initiative.” Dry January began in the United Kingdom three years ago, with Alcohology Books author and app creator, Scott Stevens, being among the first to pick up the theme in 2013 in the United States.

Stevens describes the app as serving two roles. “First, for the alcoholic and non-alcoholic alike, it shows what the toxin and known carcinogen does to you. There’s a gulf of misinformation about alcohol’s short- and long-term health consequences.” He describes observational studies as “widely reported wishful thinking discredited by evidence-based science.”

The main goal for the app, in Stevens’ view, is to help those considering abstinence and those in early sobriety. “There is a constellation of motivators that will get a person to seriously consider their drinking choice. The health damage, especially the link to cancer, is one point in that constellation. It’s an eye-opener.”

The app can be found in the GooglePlay store or by typing in the shortened URL http://bit.ly/1K08gtR.

Among the Alcohology app’s vignettes:

Six Sobriety-Saving Tips

Binge Drinking vs. Daily Drinking Hazards

Breaking the Alcohol-Is-Heart-Healthy Myth

Alcohol Recovery Medications and the Quest for the Holy Grail

Four Signs of Alcohol-Related Liver Damage

Three Ways Alcohol Can Trigger Asthma

.

Screenshot_2016-01-21-19-15-52

.

Each one to two-minute segment covers one topic culled from evidence-based research. Video files and transcripts, which include citations of the scientific studies used, are found on the parent website, www.alcohologist.com.
–   –   –   –   –   –   –


Now here is part 
of his new article about the Health & Studies of alcohol benefits.
Please visit his website link to read the whole fantastic Article  USDA Misguiding Health

.

Alcohol writer: USDA “healthy” diet guide to injure Americans for 5 more years

.
“Jan. 8, 2016 — 
New governmental dietary guidelines are dangerous to the health of America and contradict common sense and evidence-based research, including research by the very organization that released the five-year recommendation. The 2015-2016 Dietary Guidelines were released jointly by the U.S. Departments of Health and Human Services (HHS) and Agriculture (USDA) Jan. 7.”

BUT… There are no documented health benefits to consuming beverage alcohol. Evidence-based studies provide robust data that conclusively demonstrate alcohol’s undisputed ability to ruin otherwise healthy tissue. It isn’t a health-conscious dietary addition in any amount. The eighth edition of the government’s guidelines state: “If alcohol is consumed, it should be consumed in moderation—up to one drink per day for women and up to two drinks per day for men—and only by adults of legal drinking age.” The statement leads to an alcohol appendix, which, “in 300 words doesn’t mention a single health consequence of drinking a toxin.” The appendix: If alcohol is consumed, it should be in moderation—up to one drink per day for women and up to two drinks per day for men—and only by adults of legal drinking age. For those who choose to drink, moderate alcohol consumption can be incorporated into the calorie limits of most healthy eating patterns.
.
The Dietary Guidelines does not recommend that individuals who do not drink alcohol start drinking for any reason; however, it does recommend that all foods and beverages consumed be accounted for within healthy eating patterns. Alcohol is not a component of the USDA Food Patterns. Thus, if alcohol is consumed, the calories from alcohol should be accounted for so that the limits on calories for other uses and total calories are not exceeded. For the purposes of evaluating amounts of alcohol that may be consumed, the Dietary Guidelines includes drink-equivalents [table]. One alcoholic drink-equivalent is described as containing 14 g (0.6 fl oz) of pure alcohol.
.
The following are reference beverages that are one alcoholic drink-equivalent: 12 fluid ounces of regular beer (5% alcohol), 5 fluid ounces of wine (12% alcohol), or 1.5 fluid ounces of 80 proof distilled spirits (40% alcohol). Packaged (e.g., canned beer, bottled wine) and mixed beverages (e.g., margarita, rum and soda, mimosa, sangria) vary in alcohol content. For this reason, it is important to determine how many alcoholic drink-equivalents are in the beverage and limit intake. [Table] lists reference beverages that are one drink-equivalent and provides examples of alcoholic drink-equivalents in other alcoholic beverages.
.
First of all, to endorse any amount of alcohol for a person with the disease of alcoholism – which afflicts 21 million Americans – is entirely irresponsible, yet they only caution those who are pregnant. Secondly, the guidelines are said to be “components of a healthy and nutritionally adequate diet to help promote health and prevent chronic diseases such as cancer, hypertension, heart disease and type 2 diabetes.” Alcohol use – even moderate use – is a risk factor for all five of those chronic diseases. Consider the evidence-based data:

Cancer:
Even moderate alcohol use may substantially increase the risk of dying from cancer, according to a study published in Feb. 2012 in the American Journal of Public Health. Alcohol use accounts for about 3.5 percent of all U.S. cancer deaths annually, according to the study. “Most deaths seemed to occur among people who consumed more than three alcoholic drinks a day, but those who consumed 1.5 beverages daily may account for up to one-third of those deaths,” the researchers concluded.


Obesity:
Alcohol is the first fuel to get burned. Fat burning is postponed for alcoholics and non-alcoholics alike because fat won’t burn when there’s alcohol in the body. Pure alcohol also is calorie dense at seven calories per gram. Only fat is denser at 9 calories per gram. Alcohol’s seven calories lack the micronutrients beneficial for a healthy metabolism, so even if a dieter swaps out food for alcohol, the alcohol calories aren’t useful. In fact, alcohol calories hasten fat storage since they don’t benefit digestion.  Alcohol reduces testosterone. Testosterone is the body’s anabolic hormone that contributes to lean muscle gain. Lower testosterone from alcohol use means less muscle, less muscle means a lower metabolic rate, and the metabolic rate dictates the body’s potential to burn fat.
Again, go take a visit to Scott’s site and read this powerful full article today.
–   –   –   –   –   –   –


ABOUT THE AUTHOR & ALCOHOL EXPERT:

.
Keynote speaker, award-winning author Scott Stevens
.

A journalist and mutual fund industry executive, Stevens has spoken at conferences nationwide. His own, candid, 86 proof, two-liter-a-day story is a startling trip close to death that hits close to home. He’s the Guy Next Door, not the common but outdated stereotype of an Alcoholic.


In What the Early Worm Gets Stevens spells out the differences between Alcoholism and alcohol abuse.  He also exposes the ethical considerations of criminal justice and “rehabilitation” programs from a business executive’s experience. The programs taxpayers fund employ a one-size-fits-all view of alcohol issues. Billions are spent on barbarism and coercion instead of common sense, science, and results. He saw it from the “inside” as well as through a journalist’s perspective.


His life accomplishments have been pretty normal peppered with outstanding experiences like meeting seven Presidents of the United States, flying with the Navy’s Blue Angels, piloting a Los Angeles Class nuclear sub and driving a NASCAR over 140 MPH on a one-mile oval.


“Most importantly, my children respect me and like me as well as love me.  Not any of the experiences or things I accomplished in the lifetime before six disastrous weeks prepared me for the few years researching, writing and living What the Early Worm Gets and Every Silver Lining Has a Cloud. The experience I came through might surprise you to find out that the kind of coercion, stigma, and misinformation that might be common in China goes on every day in 21st century America.”


Every Silver Lining Has a Cloud
 is a look at alcoholism and recovery and the role of cortisol in relapse.  Stevens uses the term Symptoms of Sobriety to indicate when lapse could be just around the corner and adds in detail about the four stressors almost every Alcoholic experience that can jeopardize sobriety.


Shortly into 2015,  his third book, Adding Fire to the Fuel, was released to critical acclaim.

.
Product Details

(click to Amazon and now released)